Red Modernism American Poetry And The Spirit Of Communism Hopkins Studies In Modernism Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free


Red Modernism

Red Modernism
Author: Mark Steven
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 142142357X
Pages: 264
Year: 2017-11-24
View: 978
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In Red Modernism, Mark Steven asserts that modernism was highly attuned—and aesthetically responsive—to the overall spirit of communism. He considers the maturation of American poetry as a longitudinal arc, one that roughly followed the rise of the USSR through the Russian Revolution and its subsequent descent into Stalinism, opening up a hitherto underexplored domain in the political history of avant-garde literature. In doing so, Steven amplifies the resonance among the universal idea of communism, the revolutionary socialist state, and the American modernist poem. Focusing on three of the most significant figures in modernist poetry—Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, and Louis Zukofsky—Steven provides a theoretical and historical introduction to modernism’s unique sense of communism while revealing how communist ideals and references were deeply embedded in modernist poetry. Moving between these poets and the work of T. S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Muriel Rukeyser, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, and many others, the book combines a detailed analysis of technical devices and poetic values with a rich political and economic context. Persuasively charting a history of the avant-garde modernist poem in relation to communism, beginning in the 1910s and reaching into the 1940s, Red Modernism is an audacious examination of the twinned history of politics and poetry.

Poetry of the Possible

Poetry of the Possible
Author: Joel Nickels
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816676089
Pages: 272
Year: 2012
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The abstractions of modernism reimagined as figurations of collective self-organization

True and Living Prophet of Destruction

True and Living Prophet of Destruction
Author: Nicholas Monk
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 082635680X
Pages: 272
Year: 2016-05-15
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Cormac McCarthy’s work sounds warnings of impending apocalypse, but it also implies that redemption remains available. Nicholas Monk argues that McCarthy’s response to the modern world is more subtle and less laden with despair than many realize, and that his work represents an understanding of the world that transcends the political divisions of right and left, escapes the reductive nature of identity politics, and looks to futures beyond the immediately adjacent. He positions McCarthy as an acute chronicler of the American condition at the beginning of a new century. Tracing the development of modernity, Monk explores the associated political and philosophical undercurrents in McCarthy and identifies how they are generated and what they oppose. He focuses on language, aesthetics, violence, the spiritual, and the natural environment and the animals that inhabit it. He examines the experience of engaging with McCarthy’s fiction in order to reveal why so many people report that “reading Cormac McCarthy changed my life.”

In Search of Russian Modernism

In Search of Russian Modernism
Author: Leonid Livak
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
ISBN: 1421426412
Pages: 392
Year: 2018-11-30
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Aiming to open an overdue debate about the academic fields of Russian and transnational modernist studies, this book is intended for an audience of scholars in comparative literary and cultural studies, specialists in Russian and transnational modernism, and researchers engaged with European cultural historiography.

Transatlantic Aliens

Transatlantic Aliens
Author: Will Norman
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421420945
Pages: 288
Year: 2016-10-18
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Examining hardboiled fiction through Flaubert, New Yorker cartoons through modernist painting, and Bette Davis through Hegel and Marx, Transatlantic Aliens challenges and changes the way we understand modernism’s place in midcentury American culture.

Collecting as Modernist Practice

Collecting as Modernist Practice
Author: Jeremy Braddock
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421403641
Pages: 336
Year: 2012-01-18
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In this highly original study, Jeremy Braddock focuses on collective forms of modernist expression—the art collection, the anthology, and the archive—and their importance in the development of institutional and artistic culture in the United States. Using extensive archival research, Braddock's study synthetically examines the overlooked practices of major American art collectors and literary editors: Albert Barnes, Alain Locke, Duncan Phillips, Alfred Kreymborg, Amy Lowell, Ezra Pound, Katherine Dreier, and Carl Van Vechten. He reveals the way collections were devised as both models for modernism's future institutionalization and culturally productive objects and aesthetic forms in themselves. Rather than anchoring his study in the familiar figures of the individual poet, artist, and work, Braddock gives us an entirely new account of how modernism was made, one centered on the figure of the collector and the practice of collecting. Collecting as Modernist Practice demonstrates that modernism's cultural identity was secured not so much through the selection of a canon of significant works as by the development of new practices that shaped the social meaning of art. Braddock has us revisit the contested terrain of modernist culture prior to the dominance of institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art and the university curriculum so that we might consider modernisms that could have been. Offering the most systematic review to date of the Barnes Foundation, an intellectual genealogy and analysis of The New Negro anthology, and studies of a wide range of hitherto ignored anthologies and archives, Braddock convincingly shows how artistic and literary collections helped define the modernist movement in the United States. -- John Xiros Cooper, The University of British Columbia

Cormac McCarthy and the Signs of Sacrament

Cormac McCarthy and the Signs of Sacrament
Author: Matthew L. Potts
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1501306561
Pages: 208
Year: 2015-09-24
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Although scholars have widely acknowledged the prevalence of religious reference in the work of Cormac McCarthy, this is the first book on the most pervasive religious trope in all his works: the image of sacrament, and in particular, of eucharist. Informed by postmodern theories of narrative and Christian theologies of sacrament, Matthew Potts reads the major novels of Cormac McCarthy in a new and insightful way, arguing that their dark moral significance coheres with the Christian theological tradition in difficult, demanding ways. Potts develops this account through an argument that integrates McCarthy's fiction with both postmodern theory and contemporary fundamental and sacramental theology. In McCarthy's novels, the human self is always dispossessed of itself, given over to harm, fate, and narrative. But this fundamental dispossession, this vulnerability to violence and signs, is also one uniquely expressed in and articulated by the Christian sacramental tradition. By reading McCarthy and this theology alongside postmodern accounts of action, identity, subjectivity, and narration, Potts demonstrates how McCarthy exploits Christian theology in order to locate the value of human acts and relations in a way that mimics the dispossessing movement of sacramental signs. This is not to claim McCarthy for theology, necessarily, but it is to assert that McCarthy generates his account of what human goodness might look like in the wake of metaphysical collapse through the explicit use of Christian theology.

Splatter Capital

Splatter Capital
Author: Mark Steven
Publisher:
ISBN: 1525246003
Pages: 252
Year: 2017-04-27
View: 277
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Argues that the ''''''''splatter'''''''' genre of horror movies are more than just 'video nasties'''''''' and should be looked at in light of their politically subversive content. Will be of interest to fans of 70s and 80s horror movies (and sub-genres like 'splatter', 'slasher' & 'gore') and anyone interested in political takes on film and culture. Marketing plans include social media campaign utilising clips & stills from key films, academic marketing to cultural/film studies departments, author essays and extracts in key publications and tie in screenings & events. Synopsis: Splatter Capital argues that the emphatically messy brand of horror mobilized in gore films is extremely responsive to the internal contradictions that threaten the future sustainability of capitalist accumulation. Splatter Capital sheds light on the revolutionary potential of cinema and how it reflects, even and especially in its margins, the economic and political fears of its day. In doing so it acts as a source of both theoretical and practical knowledge for surviving the horror movie we collectively inhabit.

The Zukofsky Era

The Zukofsky Era
Author: Ruth Jennison
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 142140611X
Pages: 248
Year: 2012-06-29
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Scholars and students of modernism especially will find much to discuss in Jennison’s theoretical study.

A Companion to Victorian Poetry

A Companion to Victorian Poetry
Author: Ciaran Cronin
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405123184
Pages: 632
Year: 2008-04-15
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This Companion brings together specially commissioned essays by distinguished international scholars that reflect both the diversity of Victorian poetry and the variety of critical approaches that illuminate it. Approaches Victorian poetry by way of genre, production and cultural context, rather than through individual poets or poems Demonstrates how a particular poet or poem emerges from a number of overlapping cultural contexts. Explores the relationships between work by different poets Recalls attention to a considerable body of poetry that has fallen into neglect Essays are informed by recent developments in textual and cultural theory Considers Victorian women poets in every chapter

Cold War Modernists

Cold War Modernists
Author: Greg Barnhisel
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231538626
Pages: 336
Year: 2015-02-24
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European intellectuals of the 1950s dismissed American culture as nothing more than cowboy movies and the A-bomb. In response, American cultural diplomats tried to show that the United States had something to offer beyond military might and commercial exploitation. Through literary magazines, traveling art exhibits, touring musical shows, radio programs, book translations, and conferences, they deployed the revolutionary aesthetics of modernism to prove—particularly to the leftists whose Cold War loyalties they hoped to secure—that American art and literature were aesthetically rich and culturally significant. Yet by repurposing modernism, American diplomats and cultural authorities turned the avant-garde into the establishment. They remade the once revolutionary movement into a content-free collection of artistic techniques and styles suitable for middlebrow consumption. Cold War Modernists documents how the CIA, the State Department, and private cultural diplomats transformed modernist art and literature into pro-Western propaganda during the first decade of the Cold War. Drawing on interviews, previously unknown archival materials, and the stories of such figures and institutions as William Faulkner, Stephen Spender, Irving Kristol, James Laughlin, and Voice of America, Barnhisel reveals how the U.S. government reconfigured modernism as a trans-Atlantic movement, a joint endeavor between American and European artists, with profound implications for the art that followed and for the character of American identity.

The Bloodaxe Book of Modern Australian Poetry

The Bloodaxe Book of Modern Australian Poetry
Author: John E. Tranter, Philip Mead
Publisher: Bloodaxe Books Limited
ISBN:
Pages: 474
Year: 1994
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Included are many major poets well-known outside of Australia, such as Peter Porter, James McAuley, Dorothy Hewett, and Gwen Harwood, as well as many poets who have long deserved international recognition. The selections offer a challenging view of "early modern poetry" in Australia up to the 1960s, and the decade of turmoil, 1965-1975, is presented with new insight. The years from 1965 to the 1990s are revealed as a period of richness and increasing diversity for the poets, showing the impact of feminism, multicultural writing, and post-modernism on their works.

The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination

The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination
Author: Leonid Livak
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804775621
Pages: 512
Year: 2010-09-10
View: 375
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This book proposes that the idea of the Jews in European cultures has little to do with actual Jews, but rather is derived from the conception of Jews as Christianity's paradigmatic Other, eternally reenacting their morally ambiguous New Testament role as the Christ-bearing and -killing chosen people of God. Through new readings of canonical Russian literary texts by Gogol, Turgenev, Chekhov, Babel, and others, the author argues that these European writers—Christian, secular, and Jewish—based their representation of Jews on the Christian exegetical tradition of anti-Judaism. Indeed, Livak disputes the classification of some Jewish writers as belonging to "Jewish literature," arguing that such an approach obscures these writers' debt to European literary traditions and their ambivalence about their Jewishness. This work seeks to move the study of Russian literature, and Russian-Jewish literature in particular, down a new path. It will stir up controversy around Christian-Jewish cultural interaction; the representation of otherness in European arts and folklore; modern Jewish experience; and Russian literature and culture.

Russian Émigrés in the Intellectual and Literary Life of Interwar France

Russian Émigrés in the Intellectual and Literary Life of Interwar France
Author: Leonid Livak
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773590986
Pages: 584
Year: 2010-07-01
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In a pioneering exploration of the intellectual and literary exchange between Russian émigrés and French intelligentsia in the 1920s and 1930s, Leonid Livak provides an impressively comprehensive bibliographic overview of a veritable "who's who" of Russian intellectuals and literati, listing all the material published by Russian émigrés or on topics pertaining to them during the period under study. Focusing attention on a largely ignored chapter of European cultural history, this volume challenges historical assumptions by demonstrating processes of cultural cross-fertilization and illuminates the precedents Russians set for political exiles in the twentieth century. A remarkable achievement in scholarship, Russian Émigrés in the Intellectual and Literary Life of Inter-War France is a valuable resource for admirers and researchers of French and Russian culture and European intellectual history.

A Brief History of American Literature

A Brief History of American Literature
Author: Richard Gray
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444392468
Pages: 420
Year: 2010-12-28
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A Brief History of American Literature offers students and general readers a concise and up-to-date history of the full range of American writing from its origins until the present day. Represents the only up-to-date concise history of American literature Covers fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction, as well as looking at other forms of literature including folktales, spirituals, the detective story, the thriller and science fiction Considers how our understanding of American literature has changed over the past twenty years Offers students an abridged version of History of American Literature, a book widely considered the standard survey text Provides an invaluable introduction to the subject for students of American literature, American studies and all those interested in the literature and culture of the United States

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